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The impermanence of emotion

Language often reflects our thoughts.  There’s a reason we don’t say “I am a broken ankle” and “I am a fever”.  And yet when it comes to emotion we say “I am depressed” or “I am angry”.

There’s a chicken and egg problem regarding influence of language on thoughts (or vice versa), and I can’t solve that.  But I can tell you that it’s easier to recognize the impermanence of your current emotion if you just think: “For the time being, I feel angry”.

This too shall pass.

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